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Joseph Lange: unfinished oil painting from Wolfgang Amadé Mozart, 1789

New Special Exhibition from 27 January 2017 Mozarthaus Vienna

Wed, 01/11/2017 - 07:58

New Special Exhibition from 27 January 2017 Mozarthaus Vienna
Mozart and his Vienna networks. A cross section

Mozart and his Vienna networks. A cross section

In 1781 Mozart took a huge step from being a hired composer in Salzburg to becoming a businessman in Vienna. To do this he needed a new place (Vienna), new clients (from emperors to private citizens), new musicians, new publishers, new venues, new sponsors, and new audiences. And, above all, to meet these challenges he needed networks. The various members only came together at his opera premieres and subscription concerts. Otherwise he contacted them individually as needed or requested.

Mozart’s father had taught him not only music but also the way to build networks. His travels as a seven-year-old child through Europe had brought him into contact with the leaders of royal and princely houses, with top clerics and even the Pope himself, as well as high-ranking military officers, scholars, artists, poets, wealthy citizens, and the regular public. As a result he had no fear of meeting people.

These childhood experiences exerted a strong influence on him and were later to prove extremely useful. Once again, he came into contact with Joseph II’s court in Vienna and with high-ranking officers, wealthy citizens, publishers, artists, poets, intellectuals, theatre people, and freemasons. Many of them helped him financially and in other ways.

Except for a few periods of crisis, Mozart was able to live well from his work and to consolidate his reputation in Europe. Without this skillful business strategy, which this exhibition spotlights,
he would not have succeeded in this way. He also set an example for composers who came after him.

Curator: Manfred Wagner

Picture:
Joseph Lange: unfinished oil painting from Wolfgang Amadé Mozart, 1789
© Internationale Stiftung Mozarteum (ISM) (middle)